NHL off-season coaching hires, like Flames’ Peters, paying major dividends | CBC Sports

NHL off-season coaching hires, like Flames’ Peters, paying major dividends | CBC Sports

It wasn’t the 15-hour flight to China for training camp that had general manager Brad Treliving’s head spinning.

It was the pace of Bill Peters’ first practice as coach of the Calgary Flames.

“I was tired watching it,” Treliving said.

Peters has lost no time in helping the Flames improve and reach first place in the Pacific Division during his first season. In fact, the six teams that hired a new coach over the summer are all doing well — certainly when compared to the five that have dumped coaches already the season. Those clubs are a combined 47-60-11 since making those moves.

Peters and Todd Reirden, who took over the defending Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals from Barry Trotz, will coach in the all-star game on Jan. 26 with their teams leading their respective divisions at the halfway mark.

Jim Montgomery’s Dallas Stars are third in the Central Division and Barry Trotz’s New York Islanders a point out of a playoff spot with extra games to play, while the New York Rangers are overachieving under David Quinn and the Carolina Hurricanes are taking steps forward after Rod Brind’Amour replaced Peters.

For Reirden and Brind’Amour, the challenge was moving up from a role as a longtime assistant. Capitals and Hurricanes players say the transitions have been smooth because each coach hasn’t altered his approach.

Puck-hounding style

“[Reirden is] a completely different person, different personality, different style and I think he’s stuck to who he is,” Capitals defenceman John Carlson said. “What’s helped him is just staying true to what we all expect out of him.”

Todd Reirden, who will coach in the all-star game later this month, has had instant success behind the Capitals’ bench after taking over from Barry Trotz. “[Reirden is] a completely different person, different personality, different style and I think he’s stuck to who he is,” says defenceman John Carlson. (Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

With almost the same roster back, Washington was expected to make the playoffs and take a good shot at repeating. Expectations were fuzzier for the Flames, Islanders and Stars.
Calgary had alternated making and missing the playoffs under coaches Bob Hartley and Glen Gulutzan before Peters took over. The Flames’ 58 points have them tied atop the Western Conference and trailing only the powerhouse Tampa Bay Lightning in the overall NHL standings, a big testament to Peters’ puck-hounding style and straightforward communication.

“He’s a great coach,” star winger Johnny Gaudreau said. “He knows how to win. It doesn’t matter if you’re top line, bottom line, if you’re not playing well you’re not going to be on the ice. He’s not going put you over the bench there. He expects a lot out of his players and it’s been great playing for him this year.”

Trotz has had a similar impact with the Islanders, bringing much-needed structure to a team that missed the playoffs in back-to-back seasons and lost point-a-game centre John Tavares to Toronto in free agency. Veteran GM Lou Lamoriello said with any coaching change three or four players get better and three or four get worse; he thinks Trotz has gotten the most out of a team far different than what he had in Washington.

Barry Trotz, who led the Capitals to a Stanley Cup championship last season, has brought much-needed structure to an Islanders outfit that missed the playoffs in back-to-back seasons. (Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

“He’s extremely detailed, very consistent in his approach as far as planning, execution, system and delivery,” Lamoriello said of Trotz. “He has an outstanding delivery to the players as far as no highs, no lows and holds them accountable to what is being asked of them.”

In Dallas, top-line centre Tyler Seguin said Montgomery has done a good job of giving players rest, sometimes opting for video work instead of practice. Despite an uproar over pointed comments made by CEO Jim Lites about the performance of Seguin and captain Jamie Benn, the Stars hold a wild-card spot in Montgomery’s first NHL season after five years at the University of Denver.

When he talks, he commands the room and I think he’s a guy you really like to play for.— Hurricanes defenceman Trevor van Riemsdyk on head coach Rod Brind’Amour

Quinn spent five seasons at Boston University before GM Jeff Gorton hired him to coach the Rangers, and the returns on that decision are already positive. His job isn’t to get New York into the playoffs right away but rather instil good habits. He is also occasionally scratching players young and old to set a standard for quality of play.

“He’s trying to set a tone of accountability here,” Gorton said. “I think he’s been consistent to who he is, and his philosophy is if guys aren’t doing the job, then I’ve got to put guys in that are going to do it.”

Consistency and familiarity have helped Brind’Amour with the Hurricanes, who lack scoring punch and have a league-worst nine-year playoff drought. The players respect his legendary work ethic.

“When he says it, you know he’s done it and it makes you want to do it, too,” defenceman Trevor van Riemsdyk said. “When he talks, he commands the room and I think he’s a guy you really like to play for.”

Credit: NHL off-season coaching hires, like Flames’ Peters, paying major dividends | CBC Sports

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